Friday, July 24, 2009

A Respected Enemy Troubled

This is a column I wrote over on a Redskins blog site, and the link can be found here:
http://fans.redskinsrule.com/_A-Respected-Enemy-Troubled/blog/283151/54110.html

Just so you know this is legit and back from a while ago... figured I'd post it here in light of the Philadelphia Eagles signing a new defensive coordinator in Johnson's absence.






As a fan of football, we’re conditioned and groomed to almost “loathe” those who oppose us. If a great leaves our team or organization, returning cloaked in enemy colors… we don’t share the same love as we once did in our days of battle with that person.

But no matter how much we may not like an opponent, many, especially those in our own division, are respected evenly to all in our very own organization. And those of us who share in fandom of the sport, not just our favorite organization, we respect the few who show class, respect, and love for their own teams, their opponents, and the game itself.

As a Redskins fan myself, I’m saddened to hear about Jim Johnson’s current status in his personal life. Even as an “Eagles hater”, I’ve always enjoyed watching Johnson’s defenses on Sundays (or Mondays or Thursdays, or even Saturdays). I appreciate what goes into a good defense, but even more-so, I respect those who consistently remain among the elite. Jim Johnson is perhaps one of the top 5 defensive coordinators in the history of the NFL. A guy who many would argue should always have been a Head Coach… he’s remained loyal to his craft and goal to be one of the best defensive coordinators in NFL history.

Mentioned with the likes of a Dick LeBeau, Monte Kiffin, Jim Schwartz, etc., Johnson is highly respected and admired. His defenses have ranked in the top 5 in almost every statistical category (including overall defense) in each of his years as a defensive coordinator for the Eagles, and are among the best ever over a stretch of seasons in comparison to other coaches throughout NFL history.

My hope, especially considering the level of competition his schemes produce and the fact that an offense that beats his defense can consider themselves a good offense, is that Johnson ends up healthy, out of his wheelchair, and back to doing what he does best (and better than most). Get well soon Jim Johnson!

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