Thursday, December 29, 2011

NFL and Concussions, Pt. II

In light of recent events in the National Football League, the focus on concussion trauma is even more under a microscope. The fire reignited recently when Colt McCoy of the Cleveland Browns was hit in the head by none other than Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison. While I defended Harrison’s fined hits in the past, I knew from experience playing football at any level that while Harrison could argue McCoy was a runner, he lowered his helmet but didn’t go low to hit McCoy in the midsection as has been specified by the NFL. While many of the rules for hitting “defenseless” receivers or QB’s are still extremely lousy there is no black & white on proper or improper technique, rather all gray area, I felt this hit was appropriately judged and interpreted on the field and after the game by refs and the league.

The problem with the hit wasn’t even as big a problem which lead to this post as what happened with McCoy afterwards. We knew it was a violent shot to the head, and McCoy never grabbed anything while he lay on the ground following the hit to suggest he was hurt anywhere other than head/neck/spine. But when he was examined on the sideline, the only focus was on his hand, and a very dazed McCoy returned to the game 2 plays later to play. It was determined after the game that McCoy had a concussion.

The NFL was already in legal dispute (hardly battle) with former players due to head trauma and lack of focus, awareness, and assistance in treatment of injuries to the head/brain of former and current players in the National Football League. The NFL’s swift and decisive decision was to place a specialist on the sidelines of NFL games who could determine whether a player was fit to return to the game after a possible concussion. This is what was proposed years ago, it was about time it happened. But a recent article I read said surveys of players from all 32 teams around the NFL suggested players were willing to hide knowing they had a head injury to play in the game and not deal with trainers and/or specialists being placed on the sideline. It flirts with the barbaric lines of toughness, earning bonuses for playing (which you cannot collect if you’re short 3 yards and your game/season was ended by a specialist on the sideline), and the outright will to play and win. But of all the players surveyed (I’m assuming it’s almost all players to get a proper estimate seeing as the NFL legitimately does take this serious), most also said they’re concerned enough with their health and prefer the benefits the NFL would be forced to offer to players who suffer head trauma.

My question to any player who suggests he’d hide his concussion… would you be willing to sign a waiver that if you do suffer head/brain trauma, the NFL would not be responsible for any damages, payment for treatment, or liable in any potential lawsuit brought forth at a future date? I know you wouldn’t be willing to do that, you know you wouldn’t be willing to do that, and everyone in the world knows it. So why even hint or suggest you’d do something that could damage your health, wellbeing, and/or life?

I understand wanting to be tough, play through injury, get the bonus for those stats you need, etc., but if you’re not willing to accept legal responsibility for your actions/decisions, why should the National Football League care or be required to help you if something happens to you?

Thursday, December 22, 2011

NFL Predictions - Week 16

Enigma's Picks:

Houston Texans @ Indianapolis Colts
Cleveland Browns @ Baltimore Ravens
Denver Broncos @ Buffalo Bills
Tampa Bay Buccaneers @ Carolina Panthers
Arizona Cardinals @ Cincinnati Bengals
Oakland Raiders @ Kansas City Chiefs
Miami Dolphins @ New England Patriots
New York Giants @ New York Jets
St. Louis Rams @ Pittsburgh Steelers
Jacksonville Jaguars @ Tennessee Titans
Minnesota Vikings @ Washington Redskins
San Diego Chargers @ Detroit Lions
Philadelphia Eagles @ Dallas Cowboys
San Francisco 49ers @ Seattle Seahawks
Chicago Bears @ Green Bay Packers
Atlanta Falcons @ New Orleans Saints




Sean's Picks:

Houston Texans @ Indianapolis Colts
Cleveland Browns @ Baltimore Ravens
Denver Broncos @ Buffalo Bills
Tampa Bay Buccaneers @ Carolina Panthers
Arizona Cardinals @ Cincinnati Bengals
Oakland Raiders @ Kansas City Chiefs
Miami Dolphins @ New England Patriots
New York Giants @ New York Jets
St. Louis Rams @ Pittsburgh Steelers
Jacksonville Jaguars @ Tennessee Titans
Minnesota Vikings @ Washington Redskins
San Diego Chargers @ Detroit Lions
Philadelphia Eagles @ Dallas Cowboys
San Francisco 49ers @ Seattle Seahawks
Chicago Bears @ Green Bay Packers
Atlanta Falcons @ New Orleans Saints

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Obesity Linked to Low Income [Duh]

So here I am sitting at the computer on Yahoo! the other day when I come across an article I found a little "interesting". It was more centralized to women, being one of those female-health online-magazine articles, but within the article, they argued with research that the results were consistent among men as well.

So while nothing about this interested me to the point of "oh, this is something new to learn", I was interested in reading what I was sure would be classic, boneheaded comments from people interviewed on the subject (economists, scientists, and doctors).

Among these putrid comments, stood one above all the rest. An economist had stated, "you would believe with all the money the high-income bracket obtains, they would be the ones more likely to suffer from obesity levels because they can afford more food." Clearly he's one of the high-income bracket members...

I wouldn't have to do research or study anything on this topic in order to tell you that I knew it to be fact that low-income = higher risk of obesity. It's pretty much uncommon sense to comprehend this fact.

You have to look no further than a McDonalds (there's one on every second or third corner of the United States if you were unaware of how to locate one, they will be marked with a big, bright yellow arch, or M in the front) to see the economic and scientific proof of this fact. The dollar menu, and meals, are loaded with fatty, processed foods which your arteries clog post-meal to prevent you from eating. Meanwhile, the "healthy, low-calorie" alternative meals sit among the most expensive products you can purchase at McDonalds. Now how/why is it that less work/preparation costs more? I don't have a specific answer to that question, and would hate to risk sounding like a conspiracy theorist against the man.

Perhaps the most infuriating thing about this study/find is that our nation's leader (not President Barack Obama, but the one who has him by the balls) is one of the most active fighters of obesity in our nation, and while these two laid out plans before the election, neither has adopted a real fight against obesity (financially). The way to fight off obesity, is obviously to eat less-fattening foods, smaller portions, and exercise. Affordability is not possible for low-income households, stress is higher among the low-income so smaller portions are a little more difficult to agree to (seeing as eating is a stress reliever and inducer), and exercise is nearly impossible for some low-income families who are working multiple jobs to just barely afford to get by.

I guess my entire point was to encourage the people who CAN do something about affordability to do it, because fair wages (no, I'm not a part of the Occupy movement who thinks nobody should have to contribute to society or whatever their stupid point is/was) could easily right that ship, leading to a healthier, happier public which leads to a healthier, happier economy.

Sunday, December 18, 2011

New Horizons...

...maybe they're not favorable.

Kim Jong Il, the charismatic leader of the North Korean communist party, passed away over the weekend as a result of mental and physical stress. That means it's now time for his third son, Kim Jong Un, to take over the country.

So here's to prayers he doesn't get too damn drunk and go fuck everyone up, because that's a crazy bastard right there.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

NFL Predictions - Week 15

Enigma's Picks:

Jacksonvilla Jaguars @ Atlanta Falcons
Dallas Cowboys @ Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Miami Dolphins @ Buffalo Bills
Seattle Seahawks @ Chicago Bears
Carolina Panthers @ Houston Texans
Tennessee Titans @ Indianapolis Colts
Green Bay Packers @ Kansas City Chiefs
New Orleans Saints @ Minnesota Vikings
Washington Redskins @ New York Giants
Cincinnati Bengals @ St. Louis Rams
Detroit Lions @ Oakland Raiders
Cleveland Browns @ Arizona Cardinals
New England Patriots @ Denver Broncos
New York Jets @ Philadelphia Eagles
Baltimore Ravens @ San Diego Chargers
Pittsburgh Steelers @ San Francisco 49ers


Sean's Picks:

Jacksonville Jaguars @ Atlanta Falcons
Dallas Cowboys @ Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Miami Dolphins @ Buffalo Bills
Seattle Seahawks @ Chicago Bears
Carolina Panthers @ Houston Texans
Tennessee Titans @ Indianapolis Colts
Green Bay Packers @ Kansas City Chiefs
New Orleans Saints @ Minnesota Vikings
Washington Redskins @ New York Giants
Cincinnati Bengals @ St. Louis Rams
Detroit Lions @ Oakland Raiders
Cleveland Browns @ Arizona Cardinals
New England Patriots @ Denver Broncos
New York Jets @ Philadelphia Eagles
Baltimore Ravens @ San Diego Chargers
Pittsburgh Steelers @ San Francisco 49ers

Thursday, December 8, 2011

NFL Predictions - Week 14

Sean's Picks:

Cleveland Browns @ Pittsburgh Steelers
Indianapolis Colts @ Baltimore Ravens
Atlanta Falcons @ Carolina Panthers
Houston Texans @ Cincinnati Bengals
Minnesota Vikings @ Detroit Lions
Tampa Bay Buccaneers @ Jacksonville Jaguars
Philadelphia Eagles @ Miami Dolphins
Kansas City Chiefs @ New York Jets
New Orleans Saints @ Tennessee Titans
New England Patriots @ Washington Redskins
San Francisco 49ers @ Arizona Cardinals
Chicago Bears @ Denver Broncos
Oakland Raiders @ Green Bay Packers
Buffalo Bills @ San Diego Chargers
New York Giants @ Dallas Cowboys
St. Louis Rams @ Seattle Seahawks


Enigma's Picks:

Cleveland Browns @ Pittsburgh Steelers
Indianapolis Colts @ Baltimore Ravens
Atlanta Falcons @ Carolina Panthers
Houston Texans @ Cincinnati Bengals
Minnesota Vikings @ Detroit Lions
Tampa Bay Buccaneers @ Jacksonville Jaguars
Philadelphia Eagles @ Miami Dolphins
Kansas City Chiefs @ New York Jets
New Orleans Saints @ Tennessee Titans
New England Patriots @ Washington Redskins
San Francisco 49ers @ Arizona Cardinals
Chicago Bears @ Denver Broncos
Oakland Raiders @ Green Bay Packers
Buffalo Bills @ San Diego Chargers
New York Giants @ Dallas Cowboys
St. Louis Rams @ Seattle Seahawks

Thursday, December 1, 2011

NFL Predictions - Week 13

Enigma's Picks:

Philadelphia Eagles @ Seattle Seahawks

Tennessee Titans @ Buffalo Bills
Kansas City Chiefs @ Chicago Bears
Atlanta Falcons @ Houston Texans
Oakland Raiders @ Miami Dolphins
Denver Broncos @ Minnesota Vikings
Indianapolis Colts @ New England Patriots
Cincinnati Bengals @ Pittsburgh Steelers
Carolina Panthers @ Tampa Bay Buccaneers
New York Jets @ Washington Redskins
Baltimore Ravens @ Cleveland Browns
Dallas Cowboys @ Arizona Cardinals
Green Bay Packers @ New York Giants
St. Louis Rams @ San Francisco 49ers
Detroit Lions @ New Orleans Saints

San Diego Chargers
@ Jacksonville Jaguars

This week I have done something I never do.. Predict against my Redskins, but lately, whenever I pick the Jets to win, they lose, so if I want the Redskins to win, I must predict the Jets to win… Sean told me to!



Sean's Picks:

Philadelphia Eagles @ Seattle Seahawks
Tennessee Titans @ Buffalo Bills
Kansas City Chiefs @ Chicago Bears
Atlanta Falcons @ Houston Texans
Oakland Raiders @ Miami Dolphins
Denver Broncos @ Minnesota Vikings
Indianapolis Colts @ New England Patriots
Cincinnati Bengals @ Pittsburgh Steelers
Carolina Panthers @ Tampa Bay Buccaneers
New York Jets @ Washington Redskins
Baltimore Ravens @ Cleveland Browns
Dallas Cowboys @ Arizona Cardinals
Green Bay Packers @ New York Giants
St. Louis Rams @ San Francisco 49ers
Detroit Lions @ New Orleans Saints
San Diego Chargers @ Jacksonville Jaguars